Updated Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Food Energetics Chart Using SFRAW Sourced Ingredients & Novel Proteins

We have recently updated our TCM Food Energetics list — we hope this is helpful to guide you to select foods according to their action on the body when it comes to supporting a balanced Chi (Yin = cooling foods, or Yang = hot foods).

SFRAW_Menu_Final
DID YOU KNOW? The colorful icons we created for each category of product indicate the general thermal/energetic quality of each food according to Traditional Chinese Medicine Food Therapy: BLUE icons represents “COOLING” foods; GREEN represents “NEUTRAL” foods; GOLD represents “WARMING” foods. Our menu board also provides this information with color coded yin/yang symbols that indicate the basic thermal property for each protein.

Keep in mind, how animals being raised for food live before slaughter (confinement operations vs. wild or truly pasture-raised; also, breed: modern commercial vs. heritage breeds); how meals/foods are prepared, and at which temperature they are served will all influence a meal’s energetic influence on the body/Chi of the consumer.

When cooked, a food’s energy is altered from the raw energy to be more warming.

  • When a “warm” ingredient is served raw and cold, this will have a cooler influence.
  • When a “cool” ingredient is served cooked/heated, it can have a warmer effect.
  • The “hottest” forms of cooking involve very high heat such as frying or grilling.
  • Steaming, baking/dehydrating, braising and other forms of “slow and low” temperature cooking is a moderate/slightly warming method of preparation.

Chinese Medicine Food Elements/Energy Overview

Examples of Seasonal Proteins:

Spring/Summer              Crab, Haddock, Mussels, Oysters, Scallops, Sardines, Salmon; Eggs (Chicken/Duck/Quail/Goose); Raw Dairy

Fall/Winter                       Venison; Beef; Clam; Shrimp; Goose; Mutton; Chicken.

Overlapping Seasons     Rabbit; Lamb.

the_four_seasons_by_yehouda_chakiDrying Foods (for damp skin, wet stools) Quail; Anchovy; Mackerel; Caraway; Garlic; Pumpkin; Alfalfa; Marjoram; Coriander; Basil; Kohlrabi; Oregano; Turnip; Daikon; Parsley.

Damp/Moistening (for dry skin; constipation) Duck, Pork, Rabbit; Mushrooms; Black Sesame; Turnips; Celery; Cucumber; Green leafy vegetables; Mung beans; Lemon, Pear; Apple; Carrot; Honey (limited/exercise caution with these due to their high glycemic index).

General Thermal Food Values

(for the wild/truly pastured/heritage choices at SFRAW)

 

Cooling Rabbit

Pork

Duck

Goose

Whitefish

Scallop

Clam

Cod

Egg Whites

Seaweed

Duck Egg

Egg Whites

Green Veggies

Mushrooms

 

 

Crab/Clam/Scallop

Cod/Whitefish

 

 

Neutral Beef

Elk

Tripe

 

Camel

Alpaca

 

 

Turkey

Quail

 

 

Herring

Sardine

Mackerel

 

Warm Alligator

Bison

Goat

 

Pheasant

Guinea Hen

 

 

Anchovy

Mussel

Salmon

 

Egg Yolks

 

 

 

Hot Chicken

Venison

Lamb

Mutton

Emu

Ostrich

 

 

Shrimp

Lobster

Trout

 

Kidneys

 

 

 

How to Choose
Individual animals may have allergic reactions or intolerances to any specific food, so, obviously, if your animal have an issue with any specific proteins, you would need to eliminate those foods from the diet, regardless of the energetic nature of the food.

Barring these types of dietary restrictions, you may want to consider incorporating food energetics into your menu selection for your animals to help them stay in balance throughout the year, and according to their imbalances/tendencies/symptoms.

For example, many hot, itchy animals enjoy relief from being plagued by these issues when we eliminate warming/hot foods such as: lamb, bison, salmon, and chicken and focus feeding cooling/cold foods such as rabbit, duck, pork, and whitefish.  Neutral foods may also be included in such a program, but the majority of the diet should be cooling foods.

Key indications that your animal may require a change to their diet, and which foods to feed/avoid, would be as follows:

signs of imbalance foods to avoid foods to include
Inflammation and heat coming off the body; hot spots; red, inflamed skin; itching; seeking cool places, panting, thirst, red eyes, panting at night, dry skin, dry cough; restlessness. Warm-Hot Cool-Neutral
Heat seeking, chilly individuals (i.e. seeks out heat/fires or sleeps under bedcovers); coldness to ears, nose, back and limbs; debilitated constitution; weak/sluggish digestion. Cooling-Cold Neutral-Hot

Choosing to feed a diet that includes foods with specific energetic properties may help animals coping with common problems, including:

History of blood loss/anemia; pale white gums; dry skin; dandruff; dry cracked paw pads; lack of stamina; weakened immune system. Colostrum & Whey
Beef
Bone Marrow
Heart
Liver
Pork
Pork Skin
Spleen
Oyster/Lobster/Sardine/Mussels/Trout/Salmon
Chicken or Duck egg yolk
Dark Leafy Greens
Kelp
Parsley
Stinky greasy dog coat, “Dog smell”, gooey eyes, ear discharges, hot spots, wet/gooey cough. Apple Cider Vinegar
Clam/Crab/Shrimp
Green Vegetables
Pearled Barley (very small amount: soaked, sprouted & over-cooked)
Kelp/Seaweed
Black Pepper

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